FAQS

When should I expect my child’s first tooth to appear?

Why does my child need dental sealants?

What should I do if my child sucks her thumb?

If my child is just going to lose his baby teeth, why should he see the dentist?

What do I need to know about fluoride?

When should I expect my child’s first tooth to appear?

Your child’s baby teeth will usually begin to erupt at between six to eight months of age. That’s why we recommend you begin bringing your child in to Kids World Dental for checkups around the age of one. By this point, your child will have a few teeth, and we can start keeping track of their developmental progress.

Why does my child need dental sealants?

During childhood, cavities are a primary concern. Dental sealants cover your child’s teeth, filling in the crevices that they might miss when they brush. This is an easy way for us to help your child avoid tooth decay and keep his or her teeth healthy into adulthood.

What should I do if my child sucks her thumb?

Thumb sucking is common, and most children quit by the time they’re four years old. However, some children do proceed to such their thumb for much longer, even after they’ve lost their baby teeth. Thumb sucking can have serious implications if done regularly once the permanent teeth have come in, so if your child doesn’t stop sucking their thumb on their own after age four, contact Kids World Dental to discuss options.

If my child is just going to lose his baby teeth, why should he see the dentist?

Primary teeth, or “baby” teeth, play a vital role in your child’s oral development. They allow your child to learn to speak and eat properly, and they act as a guide for permanent teeth. If they fall out too early because of oral health problems, it can lead to further complications including orthodontic issues. That’s why we want to help your child’s baby teeth develop properly and remain healthy until they’re ready to fall out at the appropriate time.

What do I need to know about fluoride?

Fluoride helps strengthen tooth enamel. Children between the age of 22 and 26 months should avoid too much fluoride, however, because of increased risk to fluoride toxicity. Once your child has reached the age of seven, however, there is no longer any risk of fluoride toxicity, and we’ll encourage fluoride use to strengthen developing teeth against cavities.